Richmond Confidential

richmond confidential

The nice folks at Chevron are attempting to buy another election in Northern California, spending millions to defeat a Proposition that would limit the amount of damage Big Oil can do to the environment. Illuminating coverage of the underhanded shenanigans can be found not in any of the area’s large newspapers but in a maverick online portal called “Richmond Confidential.” Call it citizen journalism, call it muckraking, call it concerned constituents digging deep for the truth — what’s happening in Richmond is a snapshot of the zeitgeist: corporate criminals buying what they want while a small group of courageous “little people” fight the power.

Revolutionary Words

Rev2_jpg

“Revolutionary Words.” Sounds intriguing, and possibly…violent?

Not that kind of revolution. We’re talking about the bloodless kind, the mind revolution, each individual looking deep and changing the one and only person he/she/we are able: ourselves, one at a time. “Revolutionary Words” are those that dare to speak the truth out loud. “Revolutionary Words” are those that refuse to accept the status quo just because that’s the way it’s always been. “Revolutionary Words” are those that question the basic assumptions our society and our lives are built upon.

Practically speaking, “Revolutionary Words” is a new Social Justice Open Mic that I’m curating under my stage persona, MK Punky. We’re looking for poets and prophets to join us in a kind and nurturing space, Elderberries Community Justice Café, where some sensational spoken word artists seen often at Da Poetry Lounge will demonstrate that the Consciousness Revolution is well underway.

We hope one . . . → Read More: Revolutionary Words

Rob Greenfield’s “Goodfluence”

Food-Waste-Fiasco-2-776x415

Rob Greenfield, 27, grew up in Northern Wisconsin planning to be a millionaire. He reasoned that having buckets of money bought one freedom. Eventually, he learned that the truth is precisely the opposite: money, acquisitiveness, and conspicuous consumption enslave us. Now, Greenfield lives a nearly moneyless life. His main food source? Dumpster diving. He’s dined at more than 500, powered himself through two cross-country bike treks, and never gotten ill. His latest cycle-across-America, entitled “Food Waste Fiasco,” shines the light of truth on one of our darkest American secrets: we eat half of what we make and throw away enough food to feed an entire duplicate America. Follow Rob’s adventures at #DonateNotDump

Honoring Our Laborers

Laboring

As we make final preparations for the most solemn American holiday, Labor Day, our mind turns to ways that we, and perhaps all of us, can make Monday’s national celebration of workers into a perfect expression of how we all really feel about laborers.

Vegas, baby!

Disneyland?

Another less exalted way of honoring those of us who actually work is to take a small slice of time out of our vacation – thirty minutes maybe? – to ask ourselves a simple question: Why do I believe what I believe?

It’s a useful line of inquiry. Had the millions of Americans . . . → Read More: Honoring Our Laborers

I Am

i-am-02

For anyone who suspects (or has figured out) that much of what is commonly understood to be The Truth About Life is actually a series of mistakes, lies, and fantasies, the film “I Am” is a powerful affirmation that we’re onto something. Director Tom Shadyac used to be Director: Tom Shadyac, the auteur of big-budget Hollywood comedies starring Jim Carrey and Eddie Murphy. Addicted to more of everything, Shadyac acquired and consumed and wondered why the hole he was trying to fill never seemed complete. After a serious illness, he switched paths. “I Am,” made with the craftsmanship of an old pro, chronicles Shadyac’s exhilarating journey toward enlightenment. Desmond Tutu, Howard Zinn, and Noam Chomsky are some of the thought leaders interviewed, along with a menagerie of brilliant authors and scientists speaking plainly and clearly. What they — and the New Tom . . . → Read More: I Am

Poem: If One Could Add the Entirety

Godhead of the light

If one could add the entirety

of what we can see

and what we can’t —

the supplicant on a rant,

the matter dark, unknowable,

a bitterness that’s stowable –

what we would have to examine

are children wrenched by famine,

a panoply of catastrophes,

like man-made war, and disease.

 

We would also deign to look

at an ancient antiquated book

imparting wisdom, dispensing lessons,

doling out her meager blessings

to those who care to think

that knowing God demands a link

to better angels, vibes much higher,

illuminated by your fire,

the one that burns within

where there’s no hell and there’s no sin.

When you glow the healing starts

proving science doth love the arts.

 

We know the good resides all ‘round,

that humble plots are sacred ground,

that if you focus on the light

you’ll develop . . . → Read More: Poem: If One Could Add the Entirety

Poem: The Difference

malnourished children

The difference ‘tween him and he

appears at first randomly

in mutations rare

results unfair

blessing him with ignorance

cursing he with intelligence.

 

 

If a plan there be

we fail to see

what force of kindness

manufactured blindess

to that which pulses like the breast

of pigeondoves and marmosets.

The one who looks not like you

the blackdykewopniggajew

heshehim your sisterbrother

emerging from a wombless mother

the difference ‘tween us and it

disappears when tightly knit.

Poem: The Most Marvelous Thought

black venus by vakhovskiy

The most marvelous thought

occurred to me, an occurrence

in and through the hollow reed

we choose to be.

 

How preposterously inconsequential

you are! Irreducibly irrelevant

speck of cosmic flotsam.

 

Now! (Like the B&B lady in Sheepland).

Somehow you feel better.

Knowing this. Having this

thought occur.

Poem: The Fine Line

honest business card

Between a reason and excuse

A fine line, a filament, a dilettante rope

Unfurls and hides. We might not see yet can’t refuse

The shades of meaning found in joy and hope.

Choose words carefully –

That’s the lesson, the lemon, the luminosity.

Should you be charged with loquacious verbosity,

Sentenced to the slammer,

Annealed by hammer,

Or whatever indignities fail to fit the crime,

Remind the judge (and jury, too),

Concoct a plan, a verbal stew,

And excuse your reason with a rhyme.

Poem: The Silliest Most Comforting Thought

raison detre

How terribly awfully

blatantly and, one might emphasize,

preposterously

naïve

to envision even for a frivolous moment

a world, or a set of circumstances,

alternating laws and chances,

in which wherein and also everything else you can dream,

human beings,

people

decide to make love

the reason for living.

 

Slilly thought yes.

Even sillier, giggly wiggly like

the tail of a pig **+*+**:

imagine, as the man said, imagine

this most preposterous fantasy:

the human race

entirely too busy making love

their reason for living

to waste lifetimes making hate.