Category: Jurisprudence

Three Strikes

Editorial Note: Our position on the death penalty has evolved in the decade since the original publication of this essay. California presently has a law on the books known as “Three Strikes” — as in, “and your out.” Recidivist criminals who have been convicted of two felonies are supposed to be scared of the penalty...

Fifty Years After Brown v. Board of Education

In 1954, after years of prevaricating and equivocating, the United States Supreme Court finally decided that the “separate but equal” test established in Plessy v. Ferguson was discriminatory and unconstitutional. For the next fifty years, people of color have been slowly integrated into our still-racist society. Today, blacks are no longer required to go to...

Why Gays Should Be Permitted to Marry

Yesterday the Massachusetts legislature voted down a constitutional amendment that would have limited the august institution of marriage to people of the opposite sex. Hateful religious types traveled from out-of-state to protest at the Senate steps, outraged at the erosion of “family values” propagated by egalitarian lawmakers who inexplicably think the laws of our nation...

What’s Wrong With ‘Hate’ Crimes

In our West Hollywood neighborhood not long ago, a gay man was brutally beaten by a trio of homophobic thugs. Much hand-wringing was done in the local press about whether the miscreants had targeted their victim simply because he was homosexual. If this were so, activists argued, the crime was even worse than a simple...

What Californians Have Done in Electing Arnie

Arnold Schwarzenegger, the Governor-elect of California, has admitted to at least one and possibly more instances of inappropriately groping female colleagues. As wary as I am of “sexual harassment” laws, particularly those that curtail free speech, the alleged Schwarzenegger incidents reported in the Los Angeles Times do not involve making a woman feel uncomfortable by...