Tagged: konik’s new discoveries

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Alan Catlin’s “Blue Velvet”

The slim chapbook “Blue Velvet,” winner of the 30th annual Slipstream Prize, is the perfect gift for someone who normally hates poetry. Author Alan Catlin, a well-published scribe intimate with the thrilling debasements of our popular culture, has written thirty or so homages(?), with titles like Blade Runner, The Deer Hunter, and Crash. His language is plain, strong,...

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Drennon Davis

DJ Yeah is an alligator with a very limited vocabulary: he can say one word. Drennon Davis is the comedian, musician, potential genius with one hand up the gator’s butt and the other on a mixing/looping machine. Davis also performs as himself — and no matter the persona he embodies, he’s consistently funny, embracing the fine line...

Joe Baumann

Joe Baumann, PhD, writes short fiction that feels hyper-realistic, plausible. That he’s able to accomplish as much while telling stories like “For Rent,” about a woman who has allowed an artist — referred to only as The Artist — to take up residence in one of her ribs, is an astonishing literary trick. The Artist...

Grimy Ghost

Once-a-month, the “underground  comedy show” Comedy Sucks pops up in Hollywood at the Nerdist Showroom. The host, Scott Black, is funny and engaging, and the young and mostly unknown comedians he presents support the show’s title only about half the time. The element that keeps us attending every month are absurdly hilarious video montages created by the...

Homo Deus

Magnificent contradictions: a book that argues for the eventual extinction of “useless” religions written by a Professor at Hebrew University in Israel; a book that envisions homo sapiens as a God-like species that, nevertheless, will soon render itself irrelevant; a book that contains many factual errors, spelling errors, and one giant conceptual mistake that, nonetheless, makes its...

The Polgar Variant

Is genius hereditary? Or can every child be groomed to be a genius? One brilliant (and controversial) father believes environment and training fosters genius. He attempts to prove his theory by raising all three of his young daughters to be world champions of chess. The engrossing Israeli documentary The Polgar Variant, about a family of Hungarian Jews living...

Rajeev Balasubramanyam

There might be more talented short fiction writers publishing today than any time in history. Even the most voracious reader can’t read them all. (Trust us, we’ve tried). Still, when we read the summer edition of The Missouri Review, the work of Rajeev Balasubramanyam, a British novelist, stood out. His story, “Professor Chandra Follows His Bliss,” about a famous...

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

The National Theatre (UK) production of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, now playing at the Ahmanson Theater in Los Angeles, introduces two new stars to area theatergoers. The first is Adam Langdon, a recent Julliard graduate, who plays Christopher, a 15 year-old autistic boy conducting an investigation into the eponymous incident. He’s sensational, from the...

This Loss Behind Us

“This Loss Behind Us” is a sports-themed poetry book containing work from the three winners of SportLiterate‘s 2017 chapbook contest. As the title suggests, cliches tend to accrue any time someone talks or writes about sports. But the poets in “This Loss” avoid that trap, offering insights and perspectives that lean toward the original and the...

The Aversive Clause

Subscribers to literary journals and supports of indie presses know that the short story is enjoying a literary renaissance. The form is alive and well — thriving, actually. We could list dozens of writers currently creating masterful, indelible work. One of these bright young lights is B.C. Edwards, whose debut collection “The Aversive Clause” illustrates...